Insight to the Word

For love to be trustworthy, it must be sincere. The word rendered “sincere” in Romans 12:9 is the Greek word anypokritos, which features a prefix that negates the root word, hypokrisis, meaning “hypocrisy.” Put together and we get “no hypocrisy” or “sincere.” When anypokritos modifies the word love, what’s in view is love without a mask, without pretense or agenda; it’s the real thing. In 2 Corinthians 6:6, the word describes the kind of love on display among true ministers of Christ: “sincere love.” But love isn’t the only virtue that this word describes. In 1 Timothy 1:5 and 2 Timothy 1:5, the word modifies “faith”—the kind of faith that characterizes faithful believers in Jesus: “I am reminded of your sincere faith, which first lived in your grandmother Lois and in your mother Eunice and, I am persuaded, now lives in you also” (2 Timothy 1:5).


Published by Intentional Faith

Devoted to a Faith that Thinks

%d bloggers like this: