In His Steps

“For this reason he had to be made like his brothers in every way, in order that he might become a merciful… high priest” (Hebrews 2:17, NIV).

Today’s portrait of Jesus describes Him as the “Merciful High Priest.” The quality of mercy is essential if Christ is to be a genuine high priest. This quality stems from the fact that He was “made like his brothers in every way” (Hebrews 2:17, NIV). By personal experience with the human race, Jesus can truly represent us as a merciful high priest. Our heavenly high priest can be kind and understanding toward the repentant sinner because He has fully satisfied the demands of the divine law by His death on the cross. He can therefore be merciful to the transgressor while being faithful to His trust.

In drafting the plan of salvation, God made absolutely sure that it contained no loopholes or flaws that could be exploited by the enemy. That’s why before becoming our high priest, Jesus first became “like His brothers in every way” (Hebrews 2:17, NIV). He was made like the human family in reality (see Philippians 2:7). He “was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15).

Jesus felt the full force of temptation and suffering (see Matthew 4). In our human struggles, we have a merciful, understanding, and compassionate high priest who is ready and available to pardon and sustain all who come to God in faith (see 1 John 1:9). He will never abandon those who come to Him fully trusting in His merits. Our approach to Him is simple: “We must daily cultivate faith, daily contemplate him who has undertaken our case, who is a merciful and faithful High Priest.”–The Youth’s Instructor, October 18, 1894.

My Prayer Today: Lord, thank You for being such a merciful high priest. Amen.

Published by Intentional Faith

Devoted to a Faith that Thinks

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