Walking in the Light

But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin.
1 John 1:7 (ᴇsᴠ)

What price are we willing to pay to have a conscience that is clear before God and others? We must overcome our natural inclination to hide our shame and come to the light, no matter what the cost.

Let’s remember these three lessons about walking in the light:

1. What we hide hurts.

There’s some truth to the statement that you are only as sick as your darkest secrets. That’s true for the person who has sinned as well as the person who has been sinned against. Those who have been the victims of injustice and now are vindictive toward others must also come to the light.

Of course “coming to the light” means different things for different people. For all of us it means honesty before God, a humble facing of our thoughts, desires, and actions no matter how shameful they might be. For others, it means the need to be reconciled to, or the need to be counseled and affirmed by those you trust. The purpose is not simply to expose the darkness, but to enjoy the light.

2. Light and darkness cannot coexist.

When we see light, we must either move toward it or move back into the darkness. If we choose to retreat into the darkness, our hearts will become a little harder and we’ll become more comfortable with the darkness. This is what happens to those whom Paul described as having a hardened conscience, cauterized by indifference to the light of God (see 1 Timothy 4:2). We should not be surprised that among the truly evil are some who, at one time, appeared to walk in the light. For the greater the light we reject, the greater the darkness we must embrace.

3. The question is not whether we have come to the light, but whether we are walking in it.

Sometimes when someone falls into sin—immorality for example—we ask, “Did he repent?” But actually the better question would be, “Is he repenting?” The person who has come to the light in the past might be walking in darkness today. Coming into the light is only the first step in the journey. The fact is that every believer should be walking in greater light today than he did yesterday. Life is a journey and only becomes a destination at death.

Keep your account with God and others current. Confess your sin to God the moment you become aware of it. No more postponing; no more hiding.

Coming to the light is always worth it, not just to clear your conscience, but to have a satisfying relationship with God. In His presence we are healed.

E. Lutzer

Published by Intentional Faith

Devoted to a Faith that Thinks

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