Not So Fast

Have you ever heard Christians talk about building the kingdom? It is interesting, though, that the Bible never uses such language. The Bible talks about waiting for the kingdom, seeking it, inheriting it, and receiving it. The gospel is what God has done for us, not what we do for God.

Unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain. Psalm 127:1

David had reached the pinnacle of his career. Israel was united. David had a new capital city and peace from his enemies (v. 1), so his thoughts turned to what he could do for God. He told the prophet Nathan of his desire to build a temple (v. 2). Nathan immediately gave him a divine building permit without stopping to pray (v. 3). Sometimes what we want to do seems so natural and right that prayer does not seem necessary.

But God came to Nathan that evening with a message for David. He withdrew the building permit. He had not asked for a house. He certainly did not need a leader that he appointed to build him one (v. 7). God reminded David of how He had taken him from a shepherd boy to the kingship (v. 8). David had success because of God (v. 9). God made three significant promises to David. First, God would make David’s name great (v. 9). This is language from God’s covenant with Abraham (Gen. 12:1–3). God’s promise to Abraham would be fulfilled through David and his descendants.

Second, God would give David a dynasty. His offspring would rule after him and build a temple (2 Sam. 7:13). David’s dynasty would endure forever (v. 16). If a son of David sinned, he would be judged; but God would not ultimately reject David’s line. This last promise provided hope for a future Davidic king, the Messiah, a promise fulfilled in Jesus (Luke 1:31–33; Acts 2:30–36; Rom.1:3).

Do your plans sometimes get ahead of God’s will for you? Tonight, take your plans to God in prayer. Hold them with an open hand and be willing to follow God’s lead.

Meek

Published by Intentional Faith

Devoted to a Faith that Thinks

%d bloggers like this: